Category Archives: Pike

Fried Fish: Pan

 

Fried Fish: Pan

 

fish

A Northern Ontario classic. I’m sure at least one member of each family in this province has their own special fried fish recipe. Here’s mine!

4-6 fish filets of your choosing
Vegetable oil
½ cup flour
2 tbsp cornstarch
¼ cup cornmeal
¼ cup bread crumbs
1 tsp mustard powder
1 tsp chili powder
2 eggs

First step to fried fish, mix your flour and cornstarch. Season generously with salt and pepper
Next, mix cornmeal and bread crumbs with seasonings and salt and pepper
Whisk eggs, add a splash of water to thin. 
Heat your pan over medium heat with ¼ inch of oil

 

This will be a three step breading process.
Start with the flour, then dip in eggs, finally coat with cornmeal mixture. 
Place fish in frying pan, cook until golden brown on both sides.

Put your own spin on the Fried Fish classic, and enjoy!

Ice Fishing Tip #10 – End with the Best

627146_orig

And last, but not least, ice fishing tip #10 from Outdoor Canada, "End with the Best". 

"If you can only go fishing a few times this winter, make sure it's at the end of the season. As the amount of daylight increases and the ice begins to honeycomb, most species-with the exception of lake trout and whitefish, which spawn in the fall-move toward the areas where they'll eventually lay their eggs. As a result, you'll find perch, sauger and walleye congregating in ever-greater numbers at the mouths of inflowing creeks, rivers and streams, as well as along windswept, rocky shorelines. Pike, on the other hand, start massing around the mouths of large, shallow, weedy bays, while black crappie flock toward small, black-bottomed coves or anywhere green pencil reeds flourish in the spring. All of this makes for the best ice fishing of the season. Just remember that the larger fish, even the plump perch and crappie, are most likely carrying eggs. So enjoy the frenzied activity—even keep a few small, immature fish for dinner—but release the larger ones. That way, we can all enjoy putting these ice-fishing tips to use for many more years to come."

Thank you  Outdoor Canada for the great tips! 

Check out the whole article in the link below. 

http://www.outdoorcanada.ca/top-ice-fishing-tips

Happy Fishing

Canadian Fishing Adventure near Blind River

20130707 005

Canadian Fishing Adventure

Beautiful day at Lake Lauzon. Lake Lauzon has about 144 kilometers of shoreline. At its deepest point the lake is about 266 ft deep. The lake has a varied fish population form Muskie, small mouth bass, pike, walleye and smelts whitefish and lake trout. Lake Lauzon flows peacefully into the north channel of Lake Huron that has a large variety of fishing and many islands to explore. The area is rich in history and sporting opportunities.

The Transcanada highway goes between Lake Lauzon and the North Channel. Because of its easy access Lake Lauzon Resort has been a favorite fishing, hunting, quad riding, camping, swimming and a central place to stop over night for a great break for a break for travelers crossing Canada.

canadian fishing adventure

canadian fishing adventure canadian fishing adventure canadian fishing adventure

 

Fishing Blind River

Harvest skyFishing Blind River

A @#%!ing Whale

“I don’t want to go fishing” I said. Anyone who knew me when I was 14 would have been surprised to hear me say that, but the truth was that I had been doing almost nothing but fishing for the last week. Besides, I just got back from Hillcrest with a bag of comic books and candy bars. And it was cold out!

But my brother Tom wasn’t in the mood to take no for an answer. “C’mon, let’s just go for a little bit.” The urgency in his voice and the fact that he was thirteen years older than I was made me think I wasn’t going to win the argument. So I did the next best thing, which was to get him to promise that we wouldn’t be out for more than 30 minutes.

It was just a walk across the street to the little aluminum boat with my dad’s 3 horsepower Evinrude on it, but I was already chilled by the time we reached it. I could see that we were the only people that would be out on the river, but that wasn’t that unusual. People in Blind River didn’t waste their time fishing the river when they had so many options available to them, but to Chicagoans like us the river held more than enough possibilities.

My brother gunned the Evinrude, which is a little like putting spurs to a turtle, but even the little spray it kicked up added to the chill I was feeling. Tom killed the engine in the middle of the river and my 30 minute countdown began. I agreed to go with him, but I never agreed to enjoy it. I was still going through the tackle box as my brother began casting. I was looking for the most obnoxious lure I could find: I wasn’t so much interested in catching fish as I was annoying them. I opted for a large silver flatfish lure with four treble hooks that dove straight towards the bottom the second you started reeling it in. I hadn’t bothered to try this lure yet this vacation since we had been trolling most of the time and the action on this thing was so intense it would have been too much for the old Evinrude.

Big Big BassI was still in no hurry to get my line in the water, but Tom shot me a look that said “C’mon, play along.” So I cast the silver monstrosity I had tied to my line and began to reel in. The pull this thing had made me wonder if I’d even notice if a fish caught a hold of it. When I reeled it in, I considered changing to some other lure that was less work, but I felt too uninspired even for that. So I tossed my lure out again and began to reel it in with a certain amount of annoyance over having to be out on the river when I could be sitting on a couch reading comic books.

And then my earlier question about whether or not I would be able to tell if a fish hit my lure was answered. Suddenly my Zebco 33 was whirring quite loudly as the line was being dragged out of it yards at a time. I’d had my fair share of battles with fish in my time, but I immediately knew this one was special. I’d had this kind of hit before, but I’d never been able to land any of them. It was going to be a struggle and I’d have to be sharp the whole time if this one was ever going to see the inside of the boat. I let him take line when he was going to but always made sure not to let him loose.

Yeah, you know how it is, when you finally catch a glimpse of your first big fish, in this case a Northern. You just see him for a second, aren’t sure exactly what it is in the dark water and all the excitement, but it’s almost frightening. Well, he caught sight of me too and decided he didn’t want any part of me. He took off again and again I struggle to haul him back in.

Life isn’t fair and often times it’s not the person that wants to fish the most that catches anything. “I just wanted to go fishing, but you had to go catch a @#%!ing whale,” said Tom. Both he and I liked to fish, but both of us were in a little deeper than we really wanted.

“I just wanted to go fishing, but you had to go catch a @#%!ing whale,” Tom repeated. He wasn’t normally one for swear words, but they were flying pretty freely at this point.    fishing blind river

big bass

We finally netted the thing and I said: “You take it off.”

“You caught it.”

There were twelve hooks total on this lure, and a good portion of them were buried deep in Northern flesh. The others were exposed, waiting to catch the first person that stuck his hand too close to this still flopping fish.

“You’re my older brother, you do it.” I said.

“I just wanted to go fishing, but you had to go catch a @#%!ing whale.” Tom was repeating this like a mantra know, but it was doing nothing to calm or center him. It was a stalemate: neither one of us was going to put our hand anywhere close to this thing’s mouth. Finally Tom flashed upon an idea: “Uncle Joe’s house is right on the river, we’ll take it there.” And so we did. We took him away from whatever he was doing in order to get this pike off the line for us.

I never weighed or measured it, but I know for a fact that it was the biggest fish I ever caught. I’m sure there a lot bigger fish in the river, but that is my story. As for Tom, I don’t remember him ever asking me if I wanted to go fishing again. fishing blind river

 

James Rozoff author

fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river

fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river

fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river

fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river fishing blind river

 

Ice Fishing Blind River Camping

Blind River Camping

Blind River Camping

Ice Fishing Blind River Camping

Beautiful Day on Lake Lauzon. We have a choices to enjoy the winter outdoors or to spend it inside. We just finished a wonderful snowshoe around the bay at Lake Lauzon Resort. near Blind River. Camping can be a all year event. What a great way to pass the winter months enjoying the great outdoors. Now time to hit the Hot tub.

 

 

 

 

                         Ice Fishing Blind River Camping

 

The Township of the North Shore is located in Northern Ontario along the North Channel of Lake Huron. Our three primary villages of Algoma Mills, Spragge and Serpent River are situated along the Highway 17 corridor approximately half-way between Sault Ste. Marie and Sudbury

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Blind River Camping

Blind River Camping

Salmon Spawning 2012 Lake Lauzon Resort

The Salmon are coming the Salmon Are coming.

 

What an amazing sight to see. At Lake Lauzon Resort the Pink and the Coho Salmon are doing their annual Dance in Lake Lauzon Creek.

Northern Pike

 

Time of Year for Pike

It is now June 1 st and it appears to be the best time to fish for the great Northern Pike and Walleye in our area. One couple reported that in their 2 day stay the caught over 80 fish at Lake Lauzon Resort. Of course most where catch and release and they had a nice snack. But what a thrill to catch one of these big boys on you line. Welcome to the edge of the great white north.